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News Nov. 22-28

News Nov. 22-28

Number of homeschoolers in DC is increasing.

Same thing in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Radio Boston explores the growth here, in a fair interview which came out after this Boston Magazine article. The Boston magazine article asks a question which I think is interesting:

More and more of Boston’s smartest families are opting out of the education system to homeschool their children. Is this the new model for creating elite kids?

Helicopter Parenting is Really a Symptom of Underparenting.

Ms. Bateman argues that the term “helicopter parenting” is far too simplistic to cover the vast array and complexity of parent-child relationships. She says parents spend less time than ever with their kids today, and could be making up for that loss with over-involvement during the time they actually are with their kids.

Her theory supports anecdotal evidence from my circle of homeschooling friends who tend to let their kids take more risks than most parents. How does your anecdotal evidence weigh in here?

On the plus side, the stats support homeschooling:

Research shows that students who are raised and educated by their parents through home education are highly successful in their postsecondary studies. According to the National Home Education Research Institute, studies show that homeschoolers who go on to college outperform their peers.

But for those kids not being homeschooled, Bateman says “[We] must pay more attention to the caregivers who help shoulder the responsibility of making kids succeed or fail.” How can we help daycare, after school, and other providers help kids learn to take risks, learn from their mistakes, and thus reduce the rampant over sensitivity we’re seeing in millennials? It seems to me, this would include some revamping of parents’ thinking on liability law.

To end, Bateman describes a friend’s novel:

Michael Anderson’s “Provoke Not the Children” describes a daunting dystopia where parents are no longer considered adequate at raising children. Instead, at a young age, the children are turned over to child-rearing professionals. What a strange, disjointed world it appears to be.

College’s cost:benefit ratio way off

And some colleges are skewing the numbers to make it look like fewer of their grads are suffocating under student loans.

From 2005 to 2012, average student loan debt has jumped 35 percent, while the median salary has dropped 2.2 percent, according to the New America Foundation.

Child Development Expert Critiques Early Childhood Education

We all share a common vision: Education is a human right and every child deserves one. An excellent, free education where learning is meaningful – with arts, play, engaging projects, and the chance to learn citizenship skills so that children can one day participate — actively and consciously – in this increasingly fragile democracy.

These words from Nancy Carlsson-Paige, recent recipient of the National Center for Fair and Open Testing’s Deborah Meier award. You can read her speech here.

It’s always encouraging to me to see movement within public education toward humanizing our nation’s children. With, as the article notes, the Gates Foundation spending $200 million to mobilize Common Core and all the testing that has followed, we know it’s an uphill battle to reduce testing in schools. I choose to homeschool for many reasons, but one of them is how I know my high-anxiety kid would crumble under so much manadory testing.

For those public school teachers, administrators, and staff who remain within the system fighting for children (and fighting for the ability to treat children as children), keep up the good work, brothers and sisters. America’s families need you.

Eleven-Year-Old organizes shoe donations for Africa

What a great way to practice leadership and learn to be a servant of others.

Rhiannon Kutzer

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Nice to meet you!

I’m Rhiannon.

You can call me Rhi for short (as in “rejoice”). I’m a fiercely independent homeschooling mom of five, a Navy wife of 13 years, and a creator of various things: articles, a semi-regular newsletter, quilts, furniture, and the occasional knitted scarf. This is the site where I write about our homeschool journey and news and happenings in the homeschool world. more about me.

Rhiannon

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Need a shot in the arm for your homeschool? Get Thrive Together, a monthly email that brings you:

--the best of the homeschool blogosphere,
--current homeschool news,
--and great quotes that will refresh your homeschool mama mind.

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  • Morning Time Details! E. (12), S. (almost 8), and L. (6). Our Morning Time morphs as the kids grow and change. It usually includes a combination of memory work and reading aloud. We try to cover a WHOLE LOT of things: Shakespeare, Bible, poetry, catechism, hymns, timeline, art study, composer study, and Ambleside selections for nature study, tales, and church history. This term I’m adding Plutarch.
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The hard part is figuring out where I want to aim, with the 5-year gap between E. and S., and then L. being a newbie to full-on school. Having moved twice in 2019, I nixed MT and just focused on individual work. That came with costs. Shakespeare, Plutarch, art study, and composer study suffered. Memory work barely happened at all. I was BUSY. We missed out on discussing things together. Now that we’re settled, it’s time to restart MT.
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This term I’ve decided to aim Shakespeare and Plutarch at the oldest, while the girls listen in and do handwriting/drawing/fine motor. I won’t ask them for much narration. Our reading schedule for these is AMBITIOUS. Maybe crazy. Then we’ll do all the memory & read aloud stuff that suits everyone. These lessons are SHORT. Then E. will go do his individual work while I read aloud w/ just the girls.
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Also, “Morning Time” is a misnomer, considering we break it up throughout the day. It should really be called Morning/Lunch/Nap Time. I need a new name. Circle Time? Except we don’t sit in a circle. Together school? Except we’re together doing school all day. I don’t think English has the word I’m looking for. Maybe Tertulia or Salon?
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Our actual coursework is: the Scottish Play, Plutarch is Alexander the Great’s life, our artist is Gustave Courbet, composer is Paganini, Bible memory is Psalm 46, Hymn is Jesus, Savior, Pilot Me, read alouds will rotate from Burgess Bird Book, Trial and Triumph, Blue Fairy Book, Voyage of the Dawn Treader, Vanderbeekers, & picture books. Timeline is from Classical Conversations. Poems are Charge of the Light Brigade, Winter Night by Teasdale, and The Land of Nod.
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Whew! It’s gonna be a fun term! What do you guys do for Morning Time?
  • #homeschool #family #weekend projects. Oldest got through a CPR course, curtains are hung, first batch ever of hard apple cider is bottled (a big learning experience!), and Morning Time for the next term is planned. 👊🏻 Time to call Dominos so these people can get fed 😂
  • Oh Halloween. That day when I pull costumes out of thin air at T-minus one hour ‘till trick-or-treating. Then one kid melts down in the middle of the fun, and is carried screaming to the car, with me hoping all the while that no one thinks I’m abducting a child. And, my favorite non-PC thought: one kid suggests we should have dressed as hobos, since we’re going around asking people to give us free candy. Phoned it in this year, Kutzers. 🤦🏻‍♀️🤷🏻‍♀️ #gladitsover For the record, we had a soccer player, an archer, Spider Girl, a princess, a tiny farmer, a witchy mom (Is that even a costume or just a Thursday?), and Bat Dad.
  • We may not get school started until 8 or 9, but we eat well while we read. “Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, and a life.” I think the house smelling like bacon counts as atmosphere. 😂🥰
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#homeschool #charlottemasonirl #homecookedmeals #livingbooks
  • A husband out to sea. A solo drive to and from MT. A freak snowstorm in September. Unpacking, appointments, and homeschooling, cooking and cleaning, laundry and loneliness without my better half and my biggest helper. All so that a grandson can learn from and adventure with his grandpa. I call it a RAGING SUCCESS.💛🥰 #family #navywifelife #homeschool #worldschool #bravewriterlifestyle
  • #pcs day 5 = #HOME (hallelujah!) 😊 and delicious homemade chili from the amazing @mythirdacrelife It was a long 3000 miles, but everyone made it here alive, if a little less sane than when we drove out of CT. #navyfamily #navywife #roadschooling #homeschool

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